Emergency contraception

posted by: Frances Mutter

Did you know that you can still get pregnant even if you took emergency contraception?

Who should take emergency contraception (EC)?

Females who do not wish to conceive should use emergency contraception (or the morning after pill as it used to be called) after unprotected sex that has taken place on any day of a natural menstrual cycle. This is also the case if their regular contraception has been compromised or used incorrectly.

What types of emergency contraception are available?

Tablets
There are two different types of tablets which are designed to stop or delay you releasing an egg (ovulating).

IUD
There is also a Copper IntraUterine Device (IUD) which is the most effective method in preventing against pregnancy (more than 99% effective).
You should always get an emergency contraception tablet even if you are hoping to have the IUD in case the IUD cannot be fitted.

How soon should you get emergency contraception?

As soon as possible!
You should get emergency contraception as soon as you realise there has been a risk of pregnancy. The longer you leave it, the less likely the tablet is going to work and you may not be suitable for an IUD.

Does emergency contraception always work?

There is no absolute guarantee that taking emergency contraception will work.  It depends on where you are in your natural cycle (if you are not taking any hormonal contraception) and the length of time after sex.
If you are about to ovulate, or have just ovulated, then the tablets are not going to work.
It’s important to remember that you can still get pregnant if you have taken emergency contraception tablets and then gone on to have further unprotected sexual intercourse later in the cycle.

You can find advice and guidance on pregnancy and your options here.

How to protect against further risks of pregnancy

We give out the most emergency contraception to people using the “withdrawal method” or incorrectly using a condom.

You can find guidance about how to correctly use a condom here.

The best way to protect against pregnancy is to use a reliable method of contraception. If  you think that you may forget to take a contraceptive pill then you could consider a long acting reversible form of contraception such as the coil or implant. There are lots of choices available and we consider the advantages and disadvantages here.

Crossing your fingers and hoping for the best is not going to prevent a pregnancy.

 

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Coronavirus Covid 19

General Advice:

Anyone who has symptoms including a new continuous cough or high temperature should stay at home and self-isolate for 7 days from when your symptoms started. This action will help to protect others in our community whilst you are infectious.

Clear advice for people with early symptoms of coronavirus is available online at nhs.uk/coronavirus .

Advice from our service:

We have updated information on the provision of routine contraception during this pandemic here.

Information is now also available to advise on sexual contact during a time of social distancing here.

There is also specific advice on coronavirus available for People Living with HIV here, and for pregnant women here

How to access the service:

We have now implemented a telephone triage system for all of our clinics. This system will be in place for the duration of the this pandemic. Please contact our services to access this triage system. Our central telephone number is 0300 303 3989.

If you are experiencing symptoms of Coronavirus please do not attend the clinic.

Please be aware that we may have to cancel, rearrange or shut clinical services in response to changing clinical and staffing pressures created by the Coronavirus outbreak. 

Alternative provision:

If you are struggling to access sexual health services, alternatives may be available:

  • Emergency Contraception - at your local pharmacy - more info
  • Contraceptive pills - obtained from your GP or bought online - more info
  • Chlamydia and gonorrhoea screening - available online for under 25s only - more info
  • HIV postal testing - available to at-risk groups for a small fee -  more info
  • HIV PEPSE - available via A+E departments - more info